3 comments

  1. chris · May 25, 2006

    some very interesting reading. I’ll admit, there is part of me that feels that this is out of my reach…but there are elements that are worth exploring.I think I visited the Reba community in the early 70s – will have to check with my folks.

  2. ron · May 25, 2006

    I think it becomes out of reach, in thinking we have to convert church congregations into monastic communities. I would love to see churches plant a few monastic communities, support and nurture them. I also don’t think we can just cookie cutter Neo-Monastic communities using models from ancient days. I do believe we need to lean back, dig through there history, their faith stories, and gleen the stuff that would most enhance a Neo-Monasticism in the world and culture we find ourselves today. I think too, each community will end up writing there own rule from what they value the most.

  3. Heid-a-wale · May 25, 2006

    There is a monastery in Mission that is a great introduction to the ancient practise of the Benedictine Rule. We have been there a few times now because it feels different than any other place I’ve been to. Brother Maurus spent hours with us one day teaching us about life there and the history of the order. It was a beautiful thing. The difficulty came when, in my head and in conversation, came the idea that anything connected with catholicism was basically evil.My evangelical training was deeply imbedded by that time, so I just never told anyone that we liked it there a lot and thought more christians should try to be like those Benedictine brothers. Then yesterday I was reading from a neomonastic link…a community in ithaca that I can’t remember the name of….anyway, they wrote at one point about God-using he/she and mother/father god in place of our usual He….I was amazed again at how quickly that fundamentalist approach reared it’s head and questioned their very faith…..knowing full well that there is no he/she/it term that could ever completely capture who God is. anyway, it is just interesting to me that here I am, emerging so to speak, and yet finding the awakening encumbered by my own history. such a typical response, to see a neomonastic community DOING and LIVING the gospel, but their language wasn’t quite traditional enough….

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